Understanding an Invisible Disease

Unfortunately, a lot of cases often go undiagnosed and undertreated, due to a lack of understanding of symptoms and inaccurate evaluation. This is why I started my blog – to raise awareness of this invisible disease.

 

dryeye

 

What is Dry Eye Syndrome? MGD? Blepharitis? Ocular Surface Disease?

Dry Eye Syndrome: Dry Eye Syndrome or Dry Eye Disease, is a common condition that occurs when the eyes don’t make enough tears, or the tears evaporate too quickly which leads to the eyes drying out and becoming red, swollen and irritated. Dry Eye Syndrome is also known as keratoconjunctivitis sicca, or simply “dry eyes”.

You are either classified as Aqueous Deficient Dry Eye (too little water or aqueous), Evaporative Dry Eye (too little oil) or BOTH, like me.

MGD (Meibomian Gland Dysfunction): MGD is blockage or some other abnormality of the meibomian glands so they don’t secrete enough oil into the tears. Because the tears then evaporate too quickly, MGD is a leading cause of Dry Eye Syndrome. It also is associated with an eyelid problem called Blepharitis.

Blepharitis: Blepharitis is a common condition where the edges of the eyelids (eyelid margins) become red and swollen (inflamed). It can develop at any age, and symptoms can include: itchy, sore and red eyelids, a burning, gritty sensation in your eyes. Some people also suffer from eyelids that stick together.

Ocular Surface Disease (OSD): Ocular Surface Diseases are disorders of the surface of the cornea – the transparent layer that forms the front of the eye which can severely affect eyesight and quality of life. Symptoms include blurry vision, discomfort or pain, redness and itching, and in severe cases, blindness due to corneal scarring.

Unfortunately, I suffer from Dry Eyes, MGD, Blepharitis & Ocular Surface Disease.

However, early diagnosis and treatment can prevent serious complications and improve quality of life so make sure you visit your optician / ophthalmologist if you think you may suffer with any of the above symptoms 🙂

 

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